ASEH 2019

Columbus, OH
April 10-14, 2019

More info here.

See our special session on the 1920’s and 1930’s here.

SMH 2019

Soldiers and Civilians in the Cauldron of War

Society For Military History Conference 2019
Columbus, OH
May 9-12, 2019

Sign up and learn more here.

3rd World Congress Of Environmental History

3rd World Congress of Environmental History

Convergences: The global south and the global north in the age of great acceleration.

22-26 July, 2019
Florianopolis, Brazil

More info here.

Irregular Ecologies: The Environmental Impact of Unconventional Warfare – A Workshop

Florianopolis, Brazil, 20–21 July 2019

Conveners: Christof Mauch, Rachel Carson Center, LMU Munich
Javier Puente, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Warfare seldom affects humans alone. While inflicting devastating effects on societies, armed conflicts also shape economic, cultural, sociopolitical, and ecological transformations. As violence territorializes, armed conflicts begin to affect the ecologies and livelihoods that once sustained them. Environmental transformation thus emerges as an inextricable correlate of human conflict. With the dawn of the Cold War, the environmental impacts of human conflict unfolded alongside the same geopolitical trends that engulfed the Global South. Decolonizing movements, guerrilla warfare, rural insurrections, and other forms of intrastate conflict developed from within ecologically fragile areas and eco-sensitive zones, including savannahs, valleys, watersheds, islands, mangroves, forests, plateaus, and jungles. Over the years, emerging and consolidated republics such as Ethiopia, Colombia, the DRC, Vietnam, Peru, Liberia, Mexico, Myanmar, the Philippines, Nepal, Uganda, Sri Lanka, and Nigeria, among others, have become gruesome epicenters of armed conflict in sensitive ecosystems and precarious agrarian landscapes.

The Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) and the Armed Conflict and Environment Research Network (ACERN) invite paper proposals for a two-day workshop focused on the interaction between guerilla warfare and social and environmental transformations in the Global South, with a special focus on the last three decades. We invite papers on questions that include, but are not limited to, the following:

• How has irregular warfare transformed or conserved environments?
• How has it reconditioned everyday life?
• What impact has it had on livelihoods and food access?
• How were chemical cycles changed through irregular warfare?

Paper proposals (300 words) should be submitted by 15 December 2018 to
<CarsonCenter@lmu.de>.

Upon acceptance, full manuscripts (2000–3000 words) should be submitted by 15 June 2019 for pre-circulation. Successful applicants will receive travel support from the RCC. They will join a group of RCC alumni and ACERN members in Florianopolis, Brazil, on the eve of the Third World Congress of Environmental History (22–26 July 2019).

WESIPS Biennial Conference 2019

Wesips Conference 2019

May 23-25, 2019
The Center for Cross-Cultural Study (Spanish Studies Abroad) in Seville, Spain

Abstract submission deadline: October 1, 2018
Submission info can be found here.

Over millennia, warfare, environmental degradation, and social inequality have brought much suffering to humankind. In an effort to facilitate interdisciplinary cross-fertilization, WESIPS brings together a cadre of internationally recognized scholars to address the underlying causes of warfare, environmental degradation, and social inequality from a host of interdisciplinary and theoretical perspectives. Setting the stage for the cumulation of knowledge, this symposium seeks to uncover effective solutions which foster peace, altruism, cooperation, social equality, and sustainable use of natural resources.

More info here.

ASEH 2019 conference: A session on the 1920s and 1930s

Dear fellow scholars of militaries and the environment,

Over the last two ASEH meetings we have had fruitful panels on disease and the aftermath of World War I, war, nationalism and natural resources (2017), and strategic planning and civil wars between the world wars (2018). Based on these excellent panels, talk has emerged about pulling together a collected volume on the military environmental history of the interwar years, akin to The Long Shadows and the forthcoming multi-author volumes on World War I and on World War II in the United States. At the 2019 conference, it is high time we take the next step towards a volume on the years between the two global wars.

For the conference here in Columbus in 2019, I would like to propose that those of us interested broadly in the interwar years should develop a roundtable or panel that looks broadly at the major themes in interwar military environmental history. From the past panels I have observed three (possibly four) broad themes that we could collectively consider in this session: 1. environmental impacts of demobilization; 2. strategic planning of resources and resilience; 3. environmental preparation/remobilization for World War II (or lack thereof). The fourth potential theme could include civil wars, empires and colonial wars. Such a session would allow us to consider the meaningful impact of the environment in a historiography that has been dominated by a political and economic focus. Given the theme of the conference on “Using Environmental History” a discussion of strategic planning of resources and the lessons this history teaches us seems particularly timely and relevant.

If you are interested in participating in the roundtable, please send me a short email here describing your particular area of interest and how it fits into one or more of the aforementioned themes and I will put together a proposal contingent on sufficient interest.

Jim Harris
Ohio State University

ESEH Biennial Conference 2019: Boundaries in/of Environmental History

ESEH Conference 2018

21-25 August 2019
Tallinn, Estonia

Hosting institution: Estonian Centre for Environmental History (KAJAK), University of Tallinn

The Next ESEH Biennial Conference will be held in Tallinn!

To build on the discussions at the 2017 biennial conference in Zagreb, the 2019 Tallinn conference will operate under the notion of “boundaries in/of environmental history”, and will expand the idea of natures in-between to reach out for boundaries between humans and non-humans, environment and technologies, transcorporeality, transboundary agents, planetary boundaries as well as disciplinary boundaries and boundaries of science and arts, activism, popular science, etc. Keep posted for a Call for Papers to be released in 2018! The CfP would include a specific call for inter-area/border-crossing panels to encourage cross-European comparison. We are excited to have Prof. Finn Arne Jørgensen as the head of Programme Committee.

ESEH Tallinn team has committed to an ambitious diversification policy that seeks to encourage different session formats that diversify the ways we transmit knowledge, and promote gender and age balance at our conference. We are also dedicated to seeking low-cost accommodation for participants with limited financial support. If you still cannot make it to Tallinn, don’t worry – we are hoping to live-stream some of the sessions!

See you in Tallinn!

 

Local organizing committee

Prof. Ulrike Plath (University of Tallinn)

Prof. Karsten Brüggemann (Tallinn University)

Prof. Tiiu Koff (Tallinn University)

Ass. Prof. Linda Kaljundi (Tallinn University)

Dr. Kati Lindström (KTH Royal Institute of Technology/ University of Tartu)

Ass. Prof. Marten Seppel (University of Tartu)

Dr. Erki Tammiksaar (Estonian University of Life Sciences and University of Tartu)

Dr. Kadri Tüür (Tallinn University and University of Tartu)

MA Liisi Jääts (Estonian National Museum)